Eliminate Female Genital Mutilation by 2030, say UNFPA and UNICEF

Statement by UNFPA Executive Director Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin and UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake on the 2016 International Day of Zero Tolerance for FGM

Mariame Habib, 17, was subjected to female genital mutilation (FGM) when she was a child.

Mariame Habib, 17 years old and 9 months pregnant, was subjected to (FGM/C) Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting ) when she was a child. ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2014/Tsegaye

 

NEW YORK, 5 February 2016 – “FGM is a violent practice, scarring girls for life — endangering their health, depriving them of their rights, and denying them the chance to reach their full potential. 

“FGM is widespread.  It is a global problem that goes well beyond Africa and the Middle East, where the practice has been most prevalent — affecting communities in Asia, Australia, Europe, North and South America.  And the number of girls and women at risk will only get larger if current population trends continue, wiping out hard-won gains. 

“FGM is discrimination.  It both reflects and reinforces the discrimination against women and girls, perpetuating a vicious cycle that is detrimental to development and to our progress as a human family. 

“FGM must end. In September at the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit, 193 nations unanimously agreed to a new global target of eliminating FGM by 2030.  This recognition that FGM is a global concern is a critical milestone.  

“But the recognition, while important, is not enough.  To protect the wellbeing and dignity of every girl, we need to take responsibility as a global community for ending FGM. 

“That means we need to learn more — improving our data collection to measure the full extent of the practice — and do more. We need to encourage more communities and families to abandon FGM.  We need to work with larger numbers of medical communities — including traditional and medical professionals — persuading them to refuse to perform or support FGM.  We need to support more women and girls who have undergone the harmful practice and provide them with services and help to overcome the trauma they have suffered. And we need to support and empower girls around the world to make their voices heard and call out to put an end to FGM.  

“All of us must join in this call. There simply is no place for FGM in the future we are striving to create –  a future where every girl will grow up able to experience her inherent dignity, human rights and equality by 2030.

Trust fund donors visit of the UNFPA/UNICEF joint programme acceleration of change to eliminate FGM/C

Momina Gida, 17 years old in Aasero village, Sabure Kebele, Awash District in Afar region represents the new generation of uncut girls in the Region. ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2015/Mulatu

In Ethiopia, despite a steady reduction in FGM/C nationally over the past decade, still 23 per cent (nearly one out of four) girls between the ages of 0 to 14 undergo this practice (Welfare Monitoring Survey (WMS) 2011). According to the same source, FGM/C is practiced across all regions in Ethiopia with varying degree with the prevalence in Amhara (47 per cent), Benshangul-Gumuz (24 per cent) and Tigray (22 per cent), Oromia (17 per cent) and Harari (14 per cent). The regions with the highest prevalence rate are Somali (70 per cent) and Afar (60 per cent). The impact of FGM/C in these two regions is severe as the two regions practice the worst form of FGM/C which involves total elimination of the external female genitalia and stitching, just leaving a small opening for urination.  

The Government of Ethiopia has taken strategic and programmatic measures to eliminate FGM/C. Some of the key actions include; endorsement of the National Strategy and Action Plan on Harmful Traditional Practices against Women and Children and communication strategy for social norm change and establishment of the National Alliance to End Child Marriage and FGM/C. Moreover, the Government has shown a ground-breaking commitment to end FGM/C and child marriage by the year 2025 at the London Girls’ Summit and reinforced by setting a target to reduce the practice to 0.5 per cent in the Growth and Transformation Plan II (GTP II). 

UNICEF is supporting the Government of Ethiopia in developing a roadmap which defines the long term strategic and programme interventions and the role of different actors, strengthening the National Alliance through supporting the establishment of functional secretariat, enriching the Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey (EDHS) module to include better data and consensus building sessions with religious leaders in collaboration with UNFPA and other Alliance members.

UNICEF and UNFPA have been working hand in hand for many areas in Ethiopia for the abandonment of FGM/C. One of the exemplary programme that can be sited is the joint programme on the abandonment of Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting in Afar Region. The programme has a social mobilization component which includes; facilitated community dialogue, working with religious and clan leaders, youth dialogue targeting in and out of school girls and a care component which involves tracking cases of complications with linkage to health facilities. Also, improving enforcement of the law through increasing legal literacy, strengthening special units in the law enforcement bodies for better reporting and management of cases. The programme has recorded pronounced success in facilitating declaration of abandonment of the practice in 6 districts in Afar Region, and eventually expanding to other districts in Afar and other regions.

Posted in Child Protection, Press Release | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

UNICEF and EU save new-born lives in rural Ethiopia

By Efa Workineh, CBNC Project Officer, Save the Children, Ethiopia; Tadesse Bekele, Regional Programme Manager, Save the Children, Ethiopia; Hailemariam Legesse, Health Specialist, UNICEF Ethiopia; Asheber Gaym, Health Specialist, UNICEF Ethiopia  

Ginde Beret

Elias with mother Shure after completion of his new-born sepsis treatment provided at the village health post ©SCI/2015/Efa Workineh

Abuna Gindeberet Woreda is one of the eighteen woredas (districts) found in West Shoa Zone, Oromia Regional State, 182 km west of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia’s capital.

Baby Elias Suyum Belacho was born in Guro Furto health centre in Gartoke Kebele (sub district) of Abuna Gindeberet Woreda on September 20 2015.  His mother, Shure Negasa and father, Suyum Belacho took good care of Elias, the fourth born in the family, even prior to his birth.  During her pregnancy, Shure attended three Ante Natal Care (ANC) visits at the Guro Furto health centre. Unfortunately, she had not received the required post-natal visit schedule following her delivery.

When Elias was three weeks old, he attended the routine community based new-born care assessment provided as part of the community based new-born care programme of the national Health Extension Programme (HEP) package. (The HEP is a community health programme covering the whole of Ethiopia provided by two female community health workers (health extension workers) working at rural health posts, at present over 38,000 health extension workers are providing services in over 16,000 health posts across Ethiopia. The community based new-born care programme (CBNC) is one of the key public health interventions provided by HEP through extensive partner support. UNICEF is the major supporter of CBNC scale up in Ethiopia). Emushe Abebe, the health extension worker providing CBNC noted that Elias’ respiration rate was found to be 72 breaths per minutes in two counts; much higher than the upper limit of 60 expected at his age. During the assessment, Emushe asked Shure if she has noted any other symptoms that Elias has been showing recently. Shure explained that Elias had been coughing for the last two days. Thanks to her Community Based New-born Care (CBNC) training, the health extension worker correctly diagnosed Elias’ condition as new-born sepsis; a potentially lethal advanced infection in new-borns. In addition, she found out that Elias was underweight, which was caused by not enough breastfeeding.  As per her CBNC training, she classified Elias’s condition to be very severe. Shure was not aware that she had to breastfeed at least eight times per day and because she did not realise that Elias was seriously sick, she never reached out for medical assistance.

After counselling by the health extension worker, Shure agreed to start the treatment at home immediately and to continue taking Elias to the health post. 48 hours after initiating the standardised (Chart Booklet) treatment with gentamicin and amoxicillin antibiotics, the HEW assessed the status of the child and found that he was rapidly improving. By now he was physically stable:  he showed a lower breathing rate of 48/minute and he was breastfed more than 10 times a day. Following the seven days’ full course treatment, Elias completely recovered from his illness.

Elias’ mother Shure Negasa, who was not aware of her child being in life threatening condition, has promised to seriously take care for her new-born child and other children. From now onwards she will seek health care when ever needed and she will teach her neighbour’s what she experienced.

When Ethiopia along with 196 other countries signed the Millennium Declaration in New York in 2000, maternal and child health situation was bad for the majority of the population. Under five mortality rate – number of children dying before their fifth birthday from 1000 born alive- in 1990 (the beginning of measurements for the MDGs) was 222; one of the highest in the world. Many were sceptical that the country would achieve the targeted reduction of two thirds of the 1990 levels by 2015. Against all odds, the country has achieved child health target of the millennium development goals MDG 4 three years ahead of 2015 by reducing the 1990 child mortality rate to less than 68 child deaths per 1000 live births.

Clear health policy and strong implementation supported by coordinated international partnership; a large scale community health programme targeting rural villages through the health extension programme; sustained investments in health and sustained economic growth are among the reasons for this success story.

Highly appreciable as the improvements in child health are, an under five mortality rate of 68 translates to the unacceptable number of over 200,000 child deaths annually. More than 43 per cent of these child deaths occur during the first 28 days following child birth (the neonatal period) the majority occurring in the few days following birth. Breathing difficulties; premature birth and new-born infections/sepsis are responsible for the majority of neonatal deaths and most are preventable or easily treatable with currently available medical care. Access to health care is nevertheless essential to obtain the benefits of these lifesaving interventions. For the tens of thousands of new-borns born at home and far from health facilities, accessing these lifesaving interventions have been largely impossible.

To overcome this formidable challenge to access key new-born health interventions, Ethiopia in collaboration with its major child health partners including UNICEF has adopted novel public health interventions of ICCM/CBNC (Integrated community case management of childhood illnesses/ community based new-born care). ICCM/CBNC interventions rely on task shifting of key child health interventions responsible for majority of child deaths to community health workers who receive training on detection and treatment of key childhood illnesses at home or at village clinics (health posts). They also timely refer new-borns and older children with severe illnesses to higher level care.

The EU-ESDE (European Union- Enhancing Skilled Delivery in Ethiopia) project, allocated Euro 42 million for a three-year support to maternal and new-born health to Ethiopia from 2014-2016. The EU is one of the major partners for the national scale up of ICCM/CBNC programme in Ethiopia. Since its inception in 2013, the ICCM/CBNC programme has rapidly scaled up to increase availability of CBNC services in 75 per cent of the total health posts in the country. Key interventions of the programme include training and mentoring of health extension workers on key skills of detections of new-borns and infants with illness through clear symptoms and signs and provision of essential interventions including provision of antibiotics to sick new-borns.  

Emushe Abebe, the HEW who provided the critical intervention that saved the life of Elias is one of the 2500 health extension workers who received training through EU-ESDE (European Union- Enhancing Skilled Delivery in Ethiopia) project support. She is saving lives of many children like Elias, and teaches mothers like Shure the importance of seeking health care.

Posted in ECHO, Ethiopia, EU, Health, HIS, MDG, Oromia | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Maternal and New-born supplies handed over to Enhance Skills for Delivery in Ethiopia

Maternal and New-born supplies handed over to Enhance Skills for Delivery in Ethiopia

Maternal and New-born supplies handed over to Enhance Skills for Delivery in Ethiopia ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2016/Sewunet

ADDIS ABABA, 26 January 2016 Today, a handover ceremony was held at Kotebe Primary Hospital to deliver essential basic emergency obstetric and new-born care supplies and a full set of anaesthesia and operation theatre equipment as part of the “Enhancing Skills for Delivery in Ethiopia” (ESDE) project.

The handover ceremony was attended by H.E Dr Kebede Worku, State Minister of Health, Mr. Thomas Huyghebaert, Head of Governance, Economic and Social Section of the European Union Delegation to Ethiopia, Ms. Patrizia DiGiovanni, Officer in Charge, UNICEF Ethiopia and representatives from Addis Ababa City Administration Health Bureau, Yeka City Administration Health Bureau, Kotebe Hospital administration and members of the media.

In April 2014, the ESDE project agreement was signed between the Federal Ministry of Health, EU and UNICEF for an amount of 1.1 billion birr (€40.2 million) which represented one of the largest grants to maternal health ever provided to Ethiopia. This funding from the EU is used to scale-up maternal health and new-born care for a three year period (2014-2016) in Ethiopia. Of this grant, €20 million is allocated to the MDG Pool Fund of the Federal Ministry of Health and the remaining half to UNICEF to procure the essential maternal and new-born supplies and equipment.

Through this project nationally, 500 health centres and 55 hospitals are supported with essential basic emergency obstetric and new-born care supplies and equipment which enables them to handle most maternal and new-born complication. Moreover, 55 primary hospitals have received full set of anaesthesia and operation theatre equipment, which helps to provide emergency caesarean and other essential lifesaving operative procedures.

To complement the supply component, the project supports training of 5000 Health Extension Workers to provide community based new-born sepsis management, 1000 midwives and nurses on competency based basic emergency obstetric and new-born care, mentoring and supportive supervision and 50 hospital staff on advanced new-born care.

Dr Kebede Worku, State Minister of Health at the Maternal and New-born supplies hand over to Enhance Skills for Delivery in Ethiopia

Dr Kebede Worku, State Minister of Health at the Maternal and New-born supplies hand over to Enhance Skills for Delivery in Ethiopia ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2016/Sewunet

At the handover ceremony, Dr Kebede Worku, State Minister of Health said, “This key contribution comes at a crucial time when Ethiopia has made considerable progress in promoting primary health care service provision through the Health Extension Programme and launched the Health Sector Transformation Plan (HSTP) and is working towards ending preventable child and maternal mortality through committing to the goals of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).”

Mr. Thomas Huyghbaert, Head of Governance, Economic and Social Section of the European Union Delegation to Ethiopia, on his part said, “The EU is very confident that the soft and hardware support of ESDE will help Ethiopian health systems in providing quality maternal and new-born health care and will further bring down child and maternal mortality rates.”

In Ethiopia, up to 15 per cent of mothers and new-borns suffer serious complications that require referral to facilities providing comprehensive emergency obstetric and neonatal care (CEmONC) services including caesarean sections, blood transfusions and emergency laparotomy. However, the availability of CEmONC has been limited with only over a hundred hospitals having the capacity to provide the service.

“UNICEF is privileged to collaborate with the Federal Ministry of Health and the European Union to procure the most essential maternal and new-born care supplies and improve the quality and accessibility of services for skilled birth attendance. We hope that this collaboration helps to significantly reduce maternal and neonatal deaths in Ethiopia and save precious lives,” said Ms Patrizia DiGiovanni, Officer in Charge, UNICEF Ethiopia.

Nationally, the ESDE project is benefitting 625,000 mothers and new-borns annually from improved access to maternal and new-born health services – a quarter of annual national deliveries. In the three year implementation period, the project is supporting close to 2 million mothers and new-borns.

Posted in Ethiopia, EU, Health, Press Release | Leave a comment

“I could help my family be free from poverty if I was educated. Not if I am married.” Lakech, 13

By Elizabeth Willmott-Harrop

Lakech, 13 8th grade, wants to be a doctor when she grows up. Out of sheer poverty, her parents arranged her a marriage with a relatively wealthy family. Having heard of this arrangement, the community conversation groups approached her parents and

Lakech, 13, had her marriage cancelled as a result of reporting her parents to the Community Conversation Group in Bandani Kebele (neighbourhood), Amhara, Ethiopia. ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2015/Mersha

Lakech*, aged 13, is from a poor family in the Bandani Kebele (neighbourhood) of the Dangla Woreda (district) in Amhara, Ethiopia. Her father, 55, is frail from ill health and her mother, 45, supports the family on her own.

Although Lakech’s older sisters have been educated, times are now hard. Lakech’s mother had arranged for her to be married, to both benefit from a dowry and to avoid the additional costs of Lakech’s presence in the household.

“We sometimes do not have enough to eat. We do not even have clothing”, explains Lakech’s mother, “I was given this dress by Hebeste the Health Extension Worker. My girls are always asking me: Why do we not have clothing? Why do we not have soap? Life is hard.”

Lakech found out about the planned marriage from school friends. She explains the impact when she found out: “I was determined not to be married. I wanted to run away, to an urban area where I would look after myself. I planned to work as a housemaid and continue my schooling. I could help my family be free from poverty if I was educated. Not if I am married.”

Lakech reported the planned marriage to Girma Demlash, the facilitator of the Community Conversation Group which campaigns against child marriage.

“I felt distrust for my parents during that time. At first my parents were angry when I reported them, as they said they had no capacity to send me to school. But we have been offered help because I reported it. So I am no longer in fear of a planned marriage,” explains Lakech.

Shashe Gebre, 45, decided to arrange marriage to her daughter Lakech 13, 8th grade, because she couldn't afford to send her to school or provide her food in the house. But after having a conversation with the community conversation groups, she decid

The Mother of Lakech, 13, agreed to cancel her daughter’s planned marriage as a result of an intervention by the Community Conversation Group in Bandani Kebele (neighbourhood), Amhara, Ethiopia. ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2015/Mersha

Lakech’s mother was relieved when the marriage was cancelled. “The Community Conversation Group told me about the legal consequences. I have been supported by the community since. My friends are very happy that Lakech will not be married,” she says.

The family has been able to access a UNICEF supported Revolving Fund to prevent child marriage. So-called because when funding is paid back by beneficiaries it is reinvested into the next family who needs it, so it circulates within the community. Families can start a business, make money and send their girls to school. Plus the fund gives support for education materials including uniform and clothing.

Meseret Debalkie, Child Protection Officer, UNICEF Ethiopia, says of the fund: “For the wealthy family you just have to change attitudes. That is relatively easy. But for the poorer families, if you do not offer any other life options, what will they do? You have to give them alternatives.”

Atalele Abera, 35, is a member of the Women’s Development Group and of the Community Conversation Group. Atalele says of Lakech’s cancelled marriage:

“The girl’s family received 1,000 ETB ($47) as a gift from the husband’s family, but we made sure they gave it back. I am following up with Lakech. I didn’t trust the parents to stick to their decision to cancel. So I visited them four times in the aftermath and continue to collect information from the neighbourhood on whether the marriage plans have really stopped.”

Lakech, 13, and her Mother.

Lakech, 13, and her Mother. Lakech’s planned marriage was cancelled as a result of an intervention by the Community Conversation Group in Bandani Kebele (neighbourhood), Amhara, Ethiopia. © UNICEF/ESARO 2015/Elizabeth Willmott-Harrop

Lakech’s mother explains that she had ambiguous feelings over educating Lakech: “I was worried that I will lose my daughters if I educate them as there are no schools nearby. My eldest daughter went to school some miles away and we have lost contact with her. So I was worried that when we face a challenge due to poverty that my other girls will do the same thing – they will leave and find a life elsewhere.

“But now we have the fund to help us. We will get 5,300 ETB ($250), I will buy sheep. It will cost me around 900 ETB ($43) to by one sheep if she is pregnant, so then I will have two. I will prepare local whisky and the leftovers from that will feed the sheep.”

*Name changed to protect identity

Posted in Amhara, Child Protection, Ethiopia, HIS | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

In a quiet rural area of Ethiopia, a three year old boy holds the promise of a healthy nation

By Johnny Magdaleno

Moges’ and his family, assisted by a UNICEF-support child health program in Romey Kebele, Deneba Woreda, Ethiopia.

Moges Teshome 3 years old with his mother Kokeb Nigusse in Romey Kebele, Deneba Woreda, Ethiopia. ©UNICEFEthiopia/2015/Michael Tsegaye

Moges dashes across the grass with a herding whip in hand. At three years old he can’t make it crack like his father or the other men in Romey Kebele (sub-district), a pastoralist area a few hours outside Addis Ababa where his family lives. But he smiles proudly as he loops it in wide circles around his head.

Today, Moges is beaming with life and colour. Three years ago, he was close to death as pneumonia and diarrhoea nearly robbed him of his life within months of his birth.

Muluemebet Balcha, one of the Health Extension Workers (HEW) that helped save Moges’ life, remembers how distraught his mother was. Ms. Muluemebet had contacted her to offer postnatal care for Moges through the Ethiopian government’s Health Extension Programme (HEP). “She was desperate. She thought the child would have died,” she said.

“I gave him treatment and on the second day he got well. I was very happy to see him survive,” she remembers.

Prior to becoming this kebele’s first HEW, Ms. Muluemebet says not all new-borns in the area were as lucky as Moges. “Before that training was given so many children who encountered the same problem died,” she said. The HEP has done wonders for families in hard-to-reach rural areas like Moges’ ever since it was established in 2003.

Health Extension Worker checks baby Moges's breathing to determine improvement of pneumonia

Health Extension Worker Haimanot Hailu checks two month old Moges Teshome’s breathing to determine if his pneumonia has improved. © UNICEF Ethiopia/2012/Getachew

With help from UN agencies like UNICEF, it continues to grow. As of 2015 there were more than 38,000 HEWs like Ms. Muluemebet working in over 16,000 health posts across the country. Each health post serves around 5,000 people, meaning the vast majority of Ethiopia’s population of 99 million are within reach of free, basic health care.

Teshome Alemu, Moges’ father, says he owes his child’s life to the HEWs. “To go to [the nearest hospital] you may not even afford the transportation cost,” he said. “If you don’t have money, you can suffer a lot. The children will also suffer.”

“The provision of this service in our Kebele is very beneficial,” he added.

In September 2013 Ethiopia turned heads around the world by announcing it had achieved Millennium Development Goal 4, which pushed for a reduction of child mortality rates by 67 percent, three years ahead of its 2015 deadline. What started as 205 deaths for every 1,000 children in 1990 tapered off to 59 deaths per 1,000 in 2015. While developments in technology and new levels of political support are partially responsible for this drop, the HEP was a key driver in making this improvement a reality.

Meeting MDG 4 was a milestone in the country’s history, but HEWs aren’t claiming “mission accomplished” quite yet.

“The size of kebeles and their population means they cannot be covered by one HEW. I am the only health worker serving this community so it is very tough to reach all the households,” says Ms. Muluemebet, outlining challenges she and the program at large still faces.

Moges’ and his family, assisted by a UNICEF-support child health program in Romey Kebele, Deneba Woreda, Ethiopia.

Moges’ and his family, assisted by a UNICEF-support child health program in Romey Kebele, Deneba Woreda, Ethiopia. ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2015/Tsegaye

Because she balances so many patients, she’s not always able to put in the time to make sure health education sticks. “Given the awareness of the community, it takes a long time to implement some of the activities. Families are getting the education needed, but sometimes it takes them a while to put it into practice,” she says.

Moges’ mother, Kokeb Nigusse, admits that while the community is grateful for the free services they provide, not everyone follows their advice to the fullest.

“They give the children medicinal drops, injections and syrup when they are sick,” she said. “They check up on the children. They also follow up and give injections to pregnant women. More significantly they advise us to deliver in health institutions and not at home.” Despite this last suggestion, she says, house deliveries still occur.

With more support from Ethiopia and UNICEF, that is beginning to change. “Before I started work, most mothers delivered at home. But now, if you take this year’s data, out of 171 pregnant mothers only 20 delivered at home,” said Ms. Muluemebet. The rest delivered at the local HEP health centre.

There have also been gains in building confidence in mothers like Ms. Kokeb, who are reluctant to vaccinate their children. “Vaccination of children was very low previously but now almost all children get vaccinated,” says Ms. Muluemebet. “I informed her that if the child gets sick he should get treatment even before baptism, because the community believes they shouldn’t get anything before baptism.”

Moges’ and his family, assisted by a UNICEF-support child health program in Romey Kebele, Deneba Woreda, Ethiopia.

Moges’ and his family in Romey Kebele, Deneba Woreda, Ethiopia. ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2015/Tsegaye

Pneumonia, diarrhoea and malaria are three of the five most common life-threatening conditions that new-borns face in Ethiopia. These threats have curtailed with the debut of the integrated community case-based management of common childhood illnesses (ICCM) regime. So far, more than 28,000 HEWs like have been trained in ICCM.

With help from the financial support of its donors, UNICEF has guided development of the ICCM and HEP programs, given technical assistance to Ethiopia’s Ministry of Health, and delivered 10,000 health kits to HEP health posts throughout the country. Ms. Muluemebet says the change from this support has been enormous.

“I am a witness to seeing mothers die while giving birth,” she says. “But with the HEP we can easily detect mothers who need help, or who need to get service at health centres, and if it is beyond their capacity they call the ambulance and they take the mother to health centre and they can be easily saved.”

Moges and Ms Kokeb were saved from having to travel great lengths to get basic care. Today they walk hand-in-hand across the bright green plains that surround their vast plot of land, happy, at ease and part of a complete family. As the HEP continues to grow, success stories like theirs will become a shared experience for millions more Ethiopians.

Posted in Health, HIS, Oromia | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

UNFPA and UNICEF shake hands for enhanced collaboration in Ethiopia

Ms Gillian Mellsop of UNICEF Ethiopia and Mr. Faustin Yao, Representative UNFPA Ethiopia signed MoU

Ms Gillian Mellsop of UNICEF Ethiopia and Mr. Faustin Yao, Representative UNFPA Ethiopia signed MoU ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2016/Sewunet

08 January 2016; Today, UNFPA and UNICEF signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for Enhanced Collaboration in Ethiopia in the areas of gender equality and women’s empowerment; adolescent and youth development and on child protection and gender-based violence in emergency and humanitarian settings. The agreement aims at encouraging and facilitating predictable, cooperative action between the two agencies, building on the comparative advantages and respective mandates.

UNFPA and UNICEF have been collaborating globally and in Ethiopia in a systematic manner in the areas of Gender equality and women’s empowerment (with a focus on Gender Based Violence and Violence against Women and Children, Abandonment of Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting and Ending Child Marriage; Adolescent & youth development (with a particular focus on HIV/AIDS and Sexual and Reproductive Health) and on child protection and gender-based violence in emergency/humanitarian settings.

Ms Gillian Mellsop of UNICEF Ethiopia and Mr. Faustin Yao, Representative UNFPA Ethiopia signed MoU“UNFPA and UNICEF strongly believe that, as declared by the Government of Ethiopia, that by 2025, Ethiopia will no longer have cases of FGM/C and Child Marriage, but this will only happen if we all work together – the government, civil society,  religious and  community leaders,  women, men, boys and the girls themselves.” said Mr. Faustin Yao, Representative UNFPA Ethiopia

“It gives me great pleasure to be signing this Memorandum of Understanding today for Enhanced Collaboration in Ethiopia. Through such strong collaboration, both agencies have successfully complemented each other’s expertise, as well as influenced one another’s thinking and actions. Let’s continue our strong partnership to achieve results for children, women and youth.” said Gillian Mellsop, UNICEF Representative to Ethiopia.

The decision to have this MoU stems from formalizing and cementing the complementarity of their work in terms of thematic and geographic convergence to avoid competition and ensure both agencies are speaking with one voice especially through common implementing partners and government stakeholders at national, federal and regional levels.

Posted in Child Protection, Press Release | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

KOICA and UNICEF’s partnership for the health of Ethiopia’s Mothers and Children

KOICA Country Director, Doh Young Ah and UNICEF representative to Ethiopia, Gillian Mellsop

KOICA Country Director, Doh Young Ah and UNICEF representative to Ethiopia, Gillian Mellsop sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to work together in a Maternal and Child Health (MCH) care project. ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2015/Sewunet

Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) announces US$ 9 million support to UNICEF for “Community Based Newborn Care” today in the UNICEF Ethiopia office. This financial support will be implemented in five zones of SNNP, Oromia and Benishangul Gumuz regions of Ethiopia.

The agreement was signed by KOICA Country Director, Doh Young Ah and UNICEF representative to Ethiopia, Gillian Mellsop.

KOICA’s support aims to strengthen Ethiopian government’s efforts to improve maternal and newborn health in hard to reach areas building mainly on the Health Extension Program and the Primary Health Care platform. Over 150,000 pregnant women and their newborns will benefit from this generous support per year, reaching over 300,000 mother-baby pairs in the coming years.

In collaboration with the Federal Ministry of Health, Regional Health Bureaus, the Ethiopia Midwifery and Paediatric associations, NGOs, donors and academic institutions, the programme aims to scale up maternal and newborn care in 5 zones covering a total population of 4 million between 2015 and 2018. This programme will contribute to the national scaling up of evidence based high impact interventions to improve maternal and newborn health at community and health facilities levels.

The combination of innovative, evidence-based strategies and the government’s long legacy of leadership on maternal, newborn and child survival is yielding impressive results. Ethiopia achieved MDG 4 three years ahead of schedule by cutting under-five mortality from 205 per 1,000 live births in 1990 to 68 per 1,000 in 2012. Ethiopia’s progress illustrates that countries can achieve dramatic declines in child mortality, despite constrained resources.

See photos here 

Posted in Health, KOICA | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment